Why Zero Injuries Does NOT Always Mean Your Worksite is Safe

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Frequently Asked Questions Volume 2

We received many positive comments regarding our first volume of Frequently Asked Questions.  Thus, Dr. Boyce wanted to dig a little deeper and provide more information regarding our BBS implementation and process based on additional questions we often receive.  Below are FAQs Volume 2.

Q . How is your process different from your competitors?  What are your strengths? 

A.  We customize processes to fit the needs of each client.  Thus, not only is the process sustainable, the benefits it produces are as well.  Although we use a tried and tested implementation method, the product you end-up with will be unique to your organization or facility yet always consistent with the principles that drive success.  Moreover, we work with our clients to

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The Safety System: Video Excerpt from Principles of Behavior-Based Safety Presentation

Dr. Boyce has posted a new video on the Center for Behavioral Safety website.  In it he discusses the “safety system” as part of his recent Principles of Behavior-Based Safety Presentation in San Francisco, CA.

You can view the video directly from www.cbsafety.com by clicking the “play” button.  Alternatively, you can click on the “YouTube” logo on the bottom right and watch it directly from the YouTube website (the YouTube page will open as a new tab in your browser.)

To book Dr. Boyce for a keynote address, technical presentation, or training, please e-mail him at ted.boyce@cbsafety.com.

Finally, please check back periodically for more excerpts from Dr. Boyce’s presentations and trainings.

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Responses to Frequently Asked Questions

The Center for Behavioral Safety often participates in professional conferences and meetings to share leading edge information regarding injury prevention, leadership, and organizational behavior more generally.  It is common in these settings to have a period of time during which participants of our sessions will ask questions.  And, there are some common ones regarding our company and our Behavior-Based Safety process.  Thus, Dr. Boyce thought it would be useful to address the top 5 questions we receive as part of our headline news.  Below are these "FAQs" and our responses.

Q. How do I know a BBS process is right for our company?

A. Our customized BBS process can reduce your injury rate by 50% in 1 year.   It can also

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Proactive Safety: How to Reduce Workplace Injuries by 50%

Seventeen years of experience helping companies improve safety performance has taught me a few lessons.  All combine good behavioral science with practical real-world application.  Following these guidelines typically produces a 50% reduction in injuries within a year.

  1.  Recognize that safety improvement is a process that takes time. Businesses are complicated systems with unique cultures.  The shared values, beliefs, and perceptions of the workforce influence performance as much as the formal company rules, regulations and policies.  No long-term behavior change will occur without changes in these accepted practices. 
  2. Customize the process to fit YOUR needs by involving employees.  Employees know more than management about workplace hazards and at-risk behaviors. Allow them to demonstrate this expertise.  If you empower employees with key decisions
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Evidence-Based Practices: How to Create Conversations that Lead to Beneficial Culture Change

Fifteen years of experience helping businesses transform their work cultures have shown me that Evidence-Based Practices around key business needs are essential. Evidence-Based Practices are simply those that allow for objective measurement of performance that should lead to a desired outcome. For example, in the Behavior-Based Safety process that we teach, safety behaviors are measured through direct observation. Then, performance feedback is provided immediately to the individual(s) observed as a means of reinforcing desired behavior and stopping undesired behavior. We stress giving positive feedback for safe performance. And, if correction is needed, we teach a constructive feedback process that allows the performer to share with the observer all factors that may have contributed to the ...

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Does Your Behavior-Based Safety Process Make the Grade?

Recently, I have found myself doing many more sessions on the benefits of behavior pinpointing to increase the success of safety programs. This has been due, in part, as a response to some powerful industry safety leaders who have mistakenly equated measurement with behavior-based safety.

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How You Can Be Proactive When it Comes to Injury Prevention

A Brief Case Study in Behavior-Based Safety

Most traditional safety systems focus on tracking injury-related incidents (e.g., OSHA/MSHA recordables, lost-time accidents) as a means of evaluating safety success. Although it is important to track these events, the incidents themselves are most likely the result of actions taken by one or more people. Thus, they are outcomes of behavior or lagging indicators of safety.

To be most successful in preventing injuries, we recommend that you focus upstream when evaluating safety success. That is, although it is important to track incidents, you should also measure the potential for incidents to occur. This will allow your department or worksite to make adjustments prior to someone getting hurt or property

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Using an Understanding of “Why People Do What They Do” to Promote Safety Improvements

Previously, I described the foundation of behavior-based safety, behavior-focused observation and feedback. Additionally, I provided some details on the essential characteristics of the observation card to be used by employees as part of a solid behavior-based safety process. If you will recall, the observations work not only to help employees look-out for one another and increase awareness, but as importantly, to produce the behavioral measures of safety. This month I will introduce the basic behavioral science understanding of “why people do what they do,” the foundation for promoting safety improvements in areas you’ve identified with your observations.

 
The ABCs of Safety Improvement
A major aspect of behavior-based approaches to safety focus on systematically studying the effects of various interventions on
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Pinpointing Behaviors and Designing an Observation Card: A First Step in Cultivating the Human Side of Safety

Last month we described the importance of focusing your safety efforts upstream from the traditional measures of safety typically used to evaluate safety success in industry. The suggestion, from the perspective of behavior-based safety, was to create a system in which you can measure on-going safety-related behaviors. Moreover, it was recommended that you involve employees in the process of measurement by having them make peer-on-peer behavioral observations. This month, I’ll describe the common characteristics of a Critical Behavior Checklist that employees can use to make observations of one another, as well as the importance of each of these characteristics. I will also discuss the inherent benefits to safety at your facility of having employees regularly make behavioral observations. The Critical Behavior Checklist ...

Continue reading Pinpointing Behaviors and Designing an Observation Card: A First Step in Cultivating the Human Side of Safety